Destinations Europe Travel

El Caminito del Rey – Walking the path of the King

My recent trip to Malaga wasn’t only about catching some winter sun, there was also some thrill seeking agenda attached to it. I wanted to finally walk the Caminito del Rey, also known in English as the King’s Little Path. It’s a suspended hiking trail along a high and spectacular gorge. The Gaitanes Gorge is a canyon, carved by the river Guadalhorce.

Caminito del Rey
Caminito del Rey

In the past this 3 kilometer hike was considered as the most dangerous in Spain mainly due to its poor maintenance. The terrifying pathway alongside a steep cliff was built over 100 years ago in order to connect the two hydroelectric plants in the town nearby. Since it was first opened by King Alfonso XIII it was named as the King’s Little Path

Over the years the construction deteriorated and basically crumbled away. Some of my friends explored it when it was still closed to the public and relished the thrill of edging across the drops with nothing below their feet.

Although it is much safer following a serious renovation project, Caminito del Rey is still a great hike for adventure and nature lovers. At the end of the day you are still walking very high up by the cliffside surrounded by stunning views. It was an incredible experience and I really loved it!

Caminito del Rey
Caminito del Rey

It is a major attraction in that part of Andalusia and reservation of the tickets in advance is certainly required. This can be done easily online and in fact Spanish railways offer some special deals combining the entrance and train tickets into good value packages. Once you arrive by train at El Chorro (which is the end of the trail) and shuttle bus will drop you off at the entrance.

The end of Caminito del Rey
The end of Caminito del Rey

Getting to Caminito del Rey was already adventurous since buying train tickets on a day didn’t really go to plan. Luckily train and bus stations in Malaga are really close to each other and I was able to come up with an alternative of a bus and taxi ride to the entrance of the trail. There was a bit of madness and travel edge for sure! What really paid off was a good prep equipping me with food and water supplies (you can’t buy there anything) and some pure luck that I met nice people to share my taxi with from Ardales.

I honestly recommend taking care of train tickets in advance though. If you don’t speak Spanish and are not used to problem solving while traveling it could be really problematic to make it.

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