My Travel Diary

Hiroshima – Dreaming of peace

This year in August Hiroshima marked 75 year since it was destroyed by an atomic bomb during World War II. These days it is a modern and lively city but can time really heal all wounds?

Cenotaph for the A-Bomb Victims

Cenotaph for the A-Bomb Victims

Visiting Hiroshima was undoubtedly an emotional experience for me. When presented with stories of people at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, people who either lost their lives or their dearest because of the A-bomb I just could not let go of that profound sadness that came over me as I was moving around the exhibition space.

As much as it is an intense experience to read about A-bomb damage I appreciated the fact that there was so much emphasis put on the importance of peace, peace education and calls for the abolition of nuclear weapons. May this never happen again.. that was the key message I was left with after my visit.

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park situated in the center of the city and it is home to the cenotaph holding the names of all of the people killed by the bomb, the Children’s Peace Monument and the Atomic Bomb Dome.

A-bomb Dome or the Genbaku Dome as it is also known, originally the Product Exhibition Hall building designed by Jan Letzel was the only structure left standing near the bomb’s hypocenter. The exposed metal dome serves as a memorial.

On my second day to clear my head and lift the spirit I decided to rent a bike from my lovely and highly recommended J-Hoppers Hostel to cycle around the city. I stopped by Hiroshima Castle, which was surrounded by the food market and crowds of people enjoying their weekend so I quickly left in search of a more calm place. A beautiful Japanese garden Shukkei-en was what I needed that day to dream of peace. No more Hiroshimas, no more Nagasakis…

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